LEVEL: A Level – Linear

EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHY CHOOSE LANGUAGES?
Studying a language will provide you with an engaging and exciting opportunity to build on your previous study of languages. The courses we offer are French and German and through social, intellectual and cultural themes you will be able to develop your linguistic knowledge and cultural understanding of the countries and communities where these languages are spoken. An opportunity to study literature or film will further increase your cultural awareness. A strong focus is placed on building students’ confidence and fluency across all the skills, using topical themes and supported by in-depth analysis of language structures.

AIMS OF THE COURSE
To develop the ability to communicate coherently with native speakers in speech and writing
To deepen knowledge about how language works
To develop an awareness and understanding of other cultures

WHAT WILL I STUDY?

Year 12 topics

Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends
• Family structures, traditional and modern values, friendships & relationships
• The ‘cyber-society’
• The place of voluntary work

Aspects of the political life in the French-speaking world
• Teenagers, the right to vote and political commitment
• Demonstrations, strikes – who holds the power?
• Politics and immigration

Year 13 topics

As above, plus:

Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues
• Positive features of diverse society
• Life for the marginalised
• How criminals are treated

Artistic culture in the French speaking world
• A culture proud of its heritage
• contemporary francophone music
• Cinema: the 7th art form

Plus:
• Grammatical structures (see syllabus for specific details)
• Developing the key skills of listening, speaking, reading & writing in French to an advanced level
• Either the study of 2 French-language books or 1 French-language book and 1 French-language film


HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?

French A level papers:
Paper 1: listening, reading & translation from & into German (50% of A-Level)

Paper 2: critical & analytical response in writing, 2 essays: one based on a literary text; the other based on either a further text or a film (20% of A-Level)

Paper 3: speaking – Discussion of a stimulus card plus presentation & discussion of research project (30% of A-Level)


USEFUL WEBSITES:
www.pinterest.com
www.theday.co.uk
http://www.france24.com/fr/


WHERE CAN LANGUAGES LEAD?
Higher Education & further language study. Many University courses now prefer a GCSE in a MFL for entry.
World of work: business, commerce & industry, travel & tourism, teaching & research, the law, journalism, the media, catering, translation & interpreting
Leisure & cultural experiences

LEVEL: A Level – Linear

EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHY CHOOSE LANGUAGES?
Studying a language will provide you with an engaging and exciting opportunity to build on your previous study of languages. The courses we offer are French and German and through social, intellectual and cultural themes you will be able to develop your linguistic knowledge and cultural understanding of the countries and communities where these languages are spoken. An opportunity to study literature or film will further increase your cultural awareness. A strong focus is placed on building students’ confidence and fluency across all the skills, using topical themes and supported by in-depth analysis of language structures.

AIMS OF THE COURSE
To develop the ability to communicate coherently with native speakers in speech and writing
To deepen knowledge about how language works
To develop an awareness and understanding of other cultures

WHAT WILL I STUDY?
Year 12 topics
Social issues & trends: being a young person in a German-speaking society
• The changing state of the family and relationships
• The digital world
• Youth culture: fashion and trends, music and TV
Political, intellectual & artistic culture: understanding the German-speaking world
• Festivals and traditions
• Art and architecture
• Cultural life in Berlin – past and present
Year 13 topics
As above, plus:
Social issues & trends: diversity & difference
• Immigration and migration
• Integration
• Racism, discrimination & diversity
Aspects of political life in the German speaking world.
• Germany and the European Union
• Politics and Youth
• German re-unification and its consequences

Plus:
• Grammatical structures (see syllabus for specific details)
• Developing the key skills of listening, speaking, reading & writing in German to an advanced level
• Either the study of 2 German-language books or 1 German-language book and 1 German-language film
HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?
German A level papers:
Paper 1: listening, reading & translation from & into German (50% of A-Level)
Paper 2: critical & analytical response in writing, 2 essays: one based on a literary text; the other based on either a further text or a film (20% of A-Level)
Paper 3: speaking – Discussion of a stimulus card plus presentation & discussion of research project (30% of A-Level)


USEFUL WEBSITES:
www.pinterest.com
http://www.dw.com/en/top-stories/s-9097
www.theday.co.uk
http://www.tagesschau.de/

TRIPS/ VISITS:
Biennnial German Trip


WHERE CAN LANGUAGES LEAD?
Higher Education & further language study. Many University courses now prefer a GCSE in a MFL for entry.
World of work: business, commerce & industry, travel & tourism, teaching & research, the law, journalism, the media, catering, translation & interpreting
Leisure & cultural experiences

LEVEL: A Level – Linear

EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHERE CAN IT LEAD?
Many Universities value students with an A Level in English as this demonstrates to them that the student is a bright, knowledgeable, academic candidate, who will be able to thrive in Higher Education. Studying English at A Level could lead into a career in Education, Law, Journalism, Media, Speech Therapy and Management. Through studying English at A Level, students will learn how to effectively articulate their ideas and opinions, a skill that is useful in most, if not all professions.

AIMS OF THE COURSE
You will develop interest in and enjoyment of literature, reading widely and independently from set texts and your own choices. You will write creative responses to reading, the development and application of knowledge, and analysis and evaluation in speech and writing.

WHAT WILL I STUDY AND HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?Questions
Section A: Unseen prose. One compulsory question on unseen prose extract (25 marks)
Section B: Comparing prose texts. One comparative question on two prose texts (25 marks)

A Level Subject content
Paper 1: Love through the ages
Study of three texts: one poetry and one prose text, of which one must be written pre-1900, and one Shakespeare play. Examination will include two unseen poems

Assessment
written exam: 3 hours
open book in Section C only
75 marks
40% of A-level

Questions
Section A: Shakespeare: one passage-based question with linked essay (25 marks)
Section B: Unseen poetry: compulsory essay question on two unseen poems (25 marks)
Section C: Comparing texts: one essay question linking two texts (25 marks)

Paper 2: Texts in shared contexts
Choice of two options:
Option 2A: WW1 and its aftermath
Option 2B: Modern times: literature from 1945 to the present day
Study of three texts: one prose, one poetry, and one drama, of which one must be written post-2000
Examination will include an unseen extract

Assessment
written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
open book
75 marks
40% of A-level

Questions
Section A: Set texts. One essay question on set text (25 marks)
Section B: Contextual linking one compulsory question on an unseen extract (25 marks)
one essay question linking two texts (25 marks)

Non-exam assessment: Independent critical study: texts across time
Comparative critical study of two texts, at least one of which must have been written pre-1900
One extended essay (2500 words) and a bibliography
Assessment
50 marks
20% of A-level
assessed by teachers
moderated by AQA

 

WHY CHOOSE ENGLISH?
Studying English at A Level allows students to broaden their knowledge of literary techniques and terminology, as well as develop their analytical skills. It also gives them the opportunity to further their understanding of how cultural, historical and societal issues have influenced the literature that they study.

LEVEL: A Level – Linear

EXAM BOARD: AQA

WHY CHOOSE ENGLISH?
Studying English at A Level allows students to broaden their knowledge of literary techniques and terminology, as well as develop their analytical skills. It also gives them the opportunity to further their understanding of how cultural, historical and societal issues have influenced the literature that they study.

AIMS OF THE COURSE
To embed topics and skills that students will come across at KS5 level and beyond in a supportive and creative environment.
To encourage students to have a passion and curiosity for learning. 
To develop students who are not afraid to fail – who dare to dream, and are equipped with the confidence and resilience they will need in order to be successful not only at KS5 level, but in their lives outside of school. 

WHAT WILL I STUDY AND HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?
We cover a wide range of topics and skills over the course of the KS5 (AS and A Level) curriculum. These include (but are not limited to):

  • Prose
  • Poetry
  • Anthology of non-fiction and fiction texts

Paper 1
What's assessed
Remembered places – the representation of place
Imagined worlds – point of view and genre in prose
Poetic voices – the forms and functions of poetic voice
Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activities

Assessed
Written exam: 3 hours
100 marks
40% of A-level

Questions
Section A – Remembered places
One compulsory question on the AQA Anthology: Paris (40 marks)
This section is closed book.

Section B – Imagined worlds
One question from a choice of two on prose set text (35 marks)
This section is open book.
Section C – Poetic voices
One question from a choice of two on poetry set text (25 marks)
This section is open book.

 

Paper 2
What's assessed
Writing about society – the role of the individual in society, and re-creative writing based on set texts
Critical commentary – evaluating own writing
Dramatic encounters – conflict in drama
Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activities

Assessed
Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
100 marks
40% of A-level

Questions
Section A – Writing about society
One piece of re-creative writing using set text (25 marks)
Critical commentary (30 marks)
This section is open book.

Section B – Dramatic encounters
One question from a choice of two on drama set text (45 marks)
This section is open book.

 

Non-examined assessment
What's assessed
Making connections – investigation on a chosen theme and texts
Methods of language analysis are integrated into the activity

Assessed
Assessed by teachers
Moderated by AQA
50 marks
20% of A-level

Task
A personal investigation that explores a specific technique or theme in both literary and non-literary discourse (2,500–3,000 words)

Assessment for students in Y12 (AS) and Y13 (A Level) is by public examination in May/ June. The AS qualification is assessed by examination only – there is no coursework/ controlled assessment. The A Level qualification is assessed by examination (80%) and by Non Examination Assessment (coursework – 20%). 
Further information about these qualifications can be found on the AQA website: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/as-and-a-level/english-language-and-literature-7706-7707

SUGGESTED EQUIPMENT
Students are recommended to attend every lesson equipped with at least one black pen, a ruler and a green pen. Coloured pens/ highlighters can also be useful.

DEPARTMENT FACILITIES
Students will spend the majority of their lessons in a classroom, although we try to build in opportunities to make use of other rooms/ facilities such as the Library, Drama Studio and computer rooms.

TRIPS AND VISITS
We aim to run one or two trips over the AS and A Level course, to broaden and enrich students’ experience of studying English Language and Literature at KS5 level.

 
WHERE CAN IT LEAD?
Having a firm and secure grasp of the English language, and being able to confidently explore and engage with a range of literature texts from both the past and present, is of vital importance in our modern world. Students who work hard in their English lessons – whatever their starting point – will find that they develop not only a wide knowledge base, but also a variety of transferable skills that will serve them well wherever their future pathways lead. 

Sixth Form Prospectus